We’re Like Icebergs

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“Each of us has an inner room where we can visit to be cleansed of fear-based thoughts and feelings. This room, the holy of holies, is a sanctuary of light.” ~ Marianne Williamson 

“We know what we are, but know not what we may be.” ~ William Shakespeare

I’ve been thinking a great deal lately about what I’m planning for my third act in life. I’ve never wanted to retire and sit in a rocking chair on our non-existent porch. 

Pursuant to that, wow I’m getting very technical here, the other day I decided to put on some music and just let my mind drift. This was something I’d been feeling the need to do for several days. So, I stopped and just did it.

I wasn’t really meditating. I was thinking about something Amanda Ellis said on her YouTube channel about the dying patriarchy and the rise of the divine feminine and how what she said helped me come up with some new directions for my long awaited second novel, when an image came into my head, an iceberg.

What I felt when I saw this iceberg was that we’re all like icebergs. There is the part of us that we display to ourselves and the world. We think that’s all we are. We accept that what we see on the surface is all there is. 

But then there is the submerged part of us that we’re most likely not very aware exists. Everyone has hidden talents and gifts that lay submerged until we decide to look for them, or until we’re called upon to use them. The best stories, in my opinion, are the ones where the characters must delve deep and find the strength to meet the challenges in front of them.

For most of my life, I’ve tried to fly below the radar. I wanted to do my work relatively unnoticed. I think I developed that practice because when I was younger, I stirred up controversy at church, and then in college. But because of that, I sabotaged myself. There were times when a little recognition for my accomplishments would have been nice, but I didn’t get it. It was like I was invisible, or that my contributions were not appreciated. 

Here are two examples. When I was about to graduate from high school, my mother became enraged when the annual church celebration for graduating seniors was cancelled. The reason they gave for cancelling the event was because I was the only person graduating that year. Mom, of course, thought I should be celebrated just like all the other graduates before and after me. I must admit it would have been nice. I was a little sad about it, but on the other hand, I was not very surprised or even upset. In a way I could see their point. Why spend all that time and effort for just one person? And besides, our family was rather controversial and even considered eccentric. And people who try to institute new ways of doing things are often ostracized.

The other example is when I decided to retire from teaching public school. Again, I was the only person leaving that year and at the end of the year gathering, no one even mentioned that I was not returning the following school year. I got no thank you for my five years of service. Yet, the year before, there was a big fuss made over the young band teacher who had only taught at the school district for one year. That one did hurt a bit, but I got over it as I started writing my first novel and began teaching at the college.

I told those stories to make the point that I have rarely felt “seen” for who I really am, at least in my working life. I have just enough family and friends who appreciate and love me to not let the others bother me. But there have been times when I wonder if I’m frightened by what I sense I’m capable of doing and being. Maybe it’s just easier to not stand out. I guess I was burned by the early controversies in my life. But now I feel like I need to finish healing those old wounds.

I’ve recently been feeling like my life is too small. Like it doesn’t fit any longer. So, I have begun to examine my long held beliefs about everything I thought to be true. Slowly, over time, some inner voice has urged me to consider that I might become more than I ever thought possible. I’ve gone back to those old questions we ask ourselves when we’re young. “Who am I? Why am I here? And what do I really want out of life?” The answers are not what I expected. 

A person who follows this blog post wrote a comment last week. She was responding to my post, “Human Connections”. What she said was something like, “It’s amazing how much we don’t know about people, especially those in our families.” And isn’t that the truth. Most of us live secret lives and even die with our stories still inside us. I don’t want to do that anymore. I want people to see the real me. I guess that’s why I started writing this blog so many years ago, to peel back the protective layers and allow myself to be open and honest about who I really am.

And I want to know more about the people around me. That’s why I created Story~Power. My hope is that the conversations with my guests will reveal things about them. Like what is it that motivates them? How do they see themselves in the stories they are drawn to? How do they share their passions, their love, their hope with the world? What do they learn about themselves from the stories, the music, and the art they consume or tell? And, maybe the most important question of all, how do stories connect us to each other?

I guess I’m an eternal optimist. I think if we can see into someone’s heart and soul, even a little bit, then maybe we can see that we are much more alike than we are different. And then we will honor each other instead of see each other as enemies. I have tried to do that in all my interactions with people. I’m not always successful, but I’d much rather try to connect with someone than to assume they are an enemy. 

I’m rambling. My mind goes off and makes connections that are sometimes hard to follow. Mostly I’ve just been thinking about what untapped potential I might have that I can develop and share. And if I can help others do the same thing through all my creative endeavors. Maybe these changing times are affecting you in similar ways. I’d love to hear your stories.

Enjoy the full moon. Take care of yourselves. Welcome to my new followers. Thanks for reading, liking, and commenting. 

Blessings.

Lucinda Sage-Midgorden © 2021

Lucinda is the author of The Space Between Time, an award finalist in the “Fiction: Fantasy” category of the 2017 Best Book Awards.

Have you ever experienced life shattering events? Yeah, most of us have. In The Space Between Time, Jenna Holden gets slammed by her fiancé walking out, her mother’s untimely death, and losing her job all in one week. But she receives unexpected help when she finds her three-times great-grandmother’s journals and begins the adventure of a lifetime.

The Space Between Time is available in all ebook formats at Smashwords and for Kindle at Amazon, or you can find the ebook at iBooks or Barnes and Noble. If you prefer a physical copy, you can find a print-on-demand version at Amazon. Stay tuned for news when the audiobook version is published.

Lucinda is also the host of Story-Power a new podcast where she and her guests discuss the stories in all formats that have changed their lives. It’s available here on Sage Woman Chronicles and on Apple, Google, and Spotify podcast apps. Please rate and leave a review. It helps people find me.

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Daydreaming Into A New Life

Red Shadow Sky
Red Shadow Sky Magic Wand Sunset Cloud Girl

“I’m often daydreaming, and it’s because I’ve always liked the idea of there being something more than the normal world.” ~ Samantha Shannon

“Visualization is daydreaming with a purpose.” ~ Bo Bennett

You don’t have to look very far to find stories of doom and gloom. Stories that share all kinds of bad news. I’m not going to enumerate them here because, well, that’s always been the case. Disasters make news. I’m not going to talk about those stories because I’m committed to sharing hope, joy, and love. So, I’m going to share a hopeful story I heard on NPR while driving home from teaching my class on Friday.

I don’t know the program because I came into he middle of it, but the reporter was talking with a psychologist about how daydreaming about something we want to experience can help lift our mood and help us get through these difficult times. They told the story of three people who had made small purchases of things that they can’t use right now. They bought those things in anticipation of better times ahead. 

The first story was about a woman who had purchased hair extensions even though she can’t go to the hair dresser right now. She bought them to help her visualize the day when she, and her hair extensions would be able to go out with friends to dinner and then a night club to dance and have fun. She takes great pleasure in looking at the the extensions adding details of the food she’ll eat, the music she and her friends will dance to. And she daydreams about what her future will be like when we’re all able to be in public places again enjoying ourselves.

The second story was about a man who purchased a bicycle that can be folded up into a small carrying case. He and his wife live in Alaska, but their children and grandchildren live in London. They haven’t seen each other in person in over a year. Their granddaughter is learning to ride a bike and the grandfather dreams of the day when he and his wife can travel to London to see their family and he and his granddaughter can go bike riding together. He too adds details to his daydream, like watching his granddaughter zooming off in front of him and then circling back to him so they can ride side by side.

The third story was about a couple who are planning to take a trip when they are able. They put a small amount of money into savings every month so they will have the funds to take the trip at the end of this nightmare. They talk often about where they want to go and how they will spend the money on dining, visits to sites, and souvenirs. Again they add as many details to their dreaming as they can to make it feel as if they really will be able to take this trip.

Each of these people said it lifts their spirits to daydream about what they’ll do with their purchases. Just daydreaming every detail helps them feel better. They enjoy the anticipation of the fun they will have and the connections they will make.

What are your dreams for the future? The psychologist on the radio said that daydreaming can bring us pleasure now, even though we’re dreaming about things we hope to do in the future. It might be a great way to help us get over some of our cabin fever, or even mild depression. It’s so easy to go into our dark feelings. I want to use daydreaming to try turning away from those and fantasize about happy events in my future.

My dreams are pretty simple. I visualize staying home most of the time doing my creative projects, getting more readers for my books and blog, and more listeners for my podcast. I dream of what life will be like when Barry retires and all the creative projects he’ll do. I dream of traveling to visit friends and family. 

I guess I’d better get the picture of the new car we want to buy and use it as a desktop photo, or print it out and put it up on my wall and dream of all the places we’ll travel to in it.

Have a magical weekend. Thanks for reading, liking and commenting. It’s nice to know someone is enjoying my blog and podcast posts. I’d love to hear what you’re daydreaming about.

Blessings.

Lucinda Sage-MIdgorden © 2021

Lucinda is the author of The Space Between Time, an award finalist in the “Fiction: Fantasy” category of the 2017 Best Book Awards.

Have you ever experienced life shattering events? Yeah, most of us have. In The Space Between Time, Jenna Holden gets slammed by her fiancé walking out, her mother’s untimely death, and losing her job all in one week. But she receives unexpected help when she finds her three-times great-grandmother’s journals and begins the adventure of a lifetime.

The Space Between Time is available in all ebook formats at Smashwords and for Kindle at Amazon, or you can find the ebook at iBooks or Barnes and Noble. If you prefer a physical copy, you can find a print-on-demand version at Amazon. Stay tuned for news when the audiobook version is published.

Lucinda is also the host of Story-Power a new podcast where she and her guests discuss the stories in all formats that have changed their lives. It’s available here on Sage Woman Chronicles and on Apple, Google, and Spotify podcast apps. Please rate and leave a review. It helps people find me.

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Support Your Local Indy Bookstore

My name is Roxanna McGinnis.  I am a lifelong lover of stories, reader of anything, and current owner of Get Lit Books in Sierra Vista, AZ.  

I was born and raised in a small town in Montana.  My dream was to become a writer, but I got writer’s block in college so instead I got a degree in English Literature from the University of Montana.  After college I went to work as a 9-1-1 dispatcher for 13 years, then eventually left that for a second career designing and delivering training programs for corporate America.  Owning a bookstore is my third career, and the one that makes me happiest!

I am married to David and we have raised three avid readers of our own who are now between the ages of 17 and 23. 

We live in Sierra Vista with two of our children and a small menagerie of cats and dogs.

Support Your Local Indy Bookstore

Works Discussed

You’ve Got Mail (1998) Nora Ephron, Director, Nikolaus Laszio, Parfumerie, Play, Nora Ephron and Delia Ephron, Screenwriters

The Shop Around the Corner (1940) Ernst Lubitsch, Director, Nilolaus Laszio, Parfumerie, Play, Samson Raphaelson, Screenwriter

Lucky Partners (1940) I think this is the movie I was referring to about the Aunt reading on the stool. Lewis Milestone, Director, Sacha Guitry, Adapted from the story “Bonne Chance”, Allan Scott, John Van Cruten, George Haight, Edwin Justus Mayer, Lewis Milestone, Franz Schulz, Screenwriters

The Temeraire Series, Naomi Novik

The Cadfael Series, Ellis Peters

The Circle of Ceridwen Series, Octavia Randolph

Outlander Series, Diana Gabaldon

Game of Thrones Series, George R.R. Martin

The Hate U Give, Angie Thompson, Novel

The Children of Blood and Bone, Children of virtue and Vengeance, Tomi Adeyemi, Novels

Eleanor, David Michaelis, Biography

How the South Won the Civil War, Heather Cox Richardson, Historical Non-Fiction

The Little Golden Books

  Old Mother Hubbard, Aurelius Battaglia

  The Pokey Little Puppy, Janette Sebring Lowrey and Gustaf Tenggren

  The Little Mommy, Sharon Kane

Raggedy Ann and Andy Series, Johnny Gruelle 

Little House on the Prairie Series, Little House in the Big Woods, Laura Ingalls Wilder and Garth Williams

Seven Alone, original title, On to Oregon, Honore Morrow, Novel, (1974) Earl Bellamy, Director, Douglas C. Stewart, Eleanor Lamb, Screenwriters

Nancy Drew Book Series,  Carolyn Keene

Agatha Christie Mysteries

Louis L’Amour, Last of the Breed, The Walking Drum

James Michener, Author

Hondo, Louis L’Amour, Novel, (1953) John Farrow, Director, James Edward Grant, Screenwriter

Still Life, Louise Penny, Novel

What Should I Read Next with Anne Bogel, Link to her website, Modern Mrs. Darcy

Anne Perry, Author of mysteries most notably the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt, and William Monk Series

Tana French, Author of mysteries most notably the Dublin Murder Squad Series

Story-Power episode 13 with Beth Orozco, “Celebration of Writing and Reading”

The Witch Elm, Tana French, Novel 

Story-Power episodes 4 & 5 with Randy Murray, “Myths, Legends, and Complicated Writers, pt. 1”

The Space Between Time, Lucinda Sage-Midgorden, Novel @smashwords, iBooks, Amazon

Bridge to Terabithia Katherine Paterson, Novel, (1985) Eric Till, Director, Nancy Sackett, Screenwriter

Judy Bloom, Author of Are You There God? among others

Beverly Cleary, Author of the Ramona Series

The Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula Le Guin, Novel

The Hobbit, J.R.R. Tolkien, Novel

The Name of the Rose, Umberto Eco, Novel

Pillars of the Earth, World Without End, A Column of Fire, Ken Follett, Novels

Pope Joan, Donna Woolfolk Cross, Novel

The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, Lisa See, also by her, Shanghai Girls, The Island of Sea Women, Novels

The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell, Robert Dugoni, Novel

Audio books to support your local Indy Bookstore, libro.fm

Ebooks to support your local Indy Bookstore, Hummingbird Digital Media

Physical books, bookshop.org to support your local Indy Bookstore

Get Lit Bookstore, Sierra Vista, Arizona @ www.getlitbooks.com

Audiobooks mentioned: The Christmas Carol, The Time Machine, Pride & Prejudice

Story-Power episode 15 with Celeste Sage-Tate and Arielle Tate, “Bridgerton and Beyond”

“Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic; they are ideally set up to understand stories.” ~ Roger C. Schank, Congnitive Scientist.

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What Does Love Really Mean?

Caring Hands

“Self-love is the source of all our other loves.” ~ Pierre Corneille 

Valentine’s Day is now celebrated as a day for romantic lovers. But I’ve been thinking about love a great deal recently. In fact, my sister, niece and I discussed this at great length in my most recent podcast episode: “Bridgerton and Beyond” which aired on Feb. 3rd. We discussed the difference between romance and a true love story. A true love story is one that includes all kinds of love where the friends, family, or lovers work on their relationships. And since I’m a fan of stories, I’d like to use three examples where the love story is embedded in a tale about self-discovery.

I’m a classic movie fan and these three examples I’m going to share with you are just a few of my very favorites. 

The first of these is Now, Voyager, (1942) with Bette Davis, Paul Henreid, and Claude Raines. This story does have a romance as an element of the story but the main theme is how learning to love oneself can change the whole trajectory of one’s life. 

Bette Davis plays a woman named Charlotte who comes from a wealthy Boston family, but she has a very unhealthy relationship with her mother. Her mother controls every aspect of her life, even though Charlotte is approaching thirty years old. Charlotte, a late child, is expected to take care of her mother in her old age, and at the beginning of the movie she has what was then called, a nervous breakdown. With the help of her sister-in-law, she goes to a sanitarium run by a progressive doctor played by Claude Raines. While she’s there, she learns techniques to deal with her oppressive mother, but more importantly she begins to love herself. 

As the movie goes along she learns to make friends and even falls in love with Jerry, played by Paul Henreid. She knows from the beginning he’s married. They don’t intend to fall in love, but they find a bond because they are in similar situations. Even though they declare their love for one another, they decide not to be together. But the point of their love story is that Jerry has a daughter who is unhappy and also has as difficult relationship with her mother. Charlotte can relate and when she meets Tina accidentally, she decides to take her under her wing. This cements her bond with Jerry. 

To me the entire point of Now, Voyager is that all love is nurtured from our love of self. Charlotte can’t defend herself from her mother, make friends, fall in love with Jerry, or help Tina until she has healed the wounds of self-hatred. And that’s what makes this movie a perfect Valentine’s Day choice. Turner Classic Movies is playing it today. But if you can’t see it today, it will most likely be available on the Watch TCM app. TCM play it often. I hope you will check it out because its message holds up amazingly well and can be appreciated by anyone watching it today.

The second movie I’d like to write about is People Will Talk (1951) with Cary Grant, Jeanne Crain, Hume Cronyn, Walter Slezak and Finlay Currie. This is a very progressive movie for it’s time. It managed to get several situations past the censors, like an unmarried pregnant woman who is not punished for her “sin”. Also there is a thinly veiled jab at the McCarthy era witch hunts. Then there is the fact that Cary Grant’s character, Dr. Praetorius not only protects his companion, Shunderson, a convicted murderer, but marries Deborah, the pregnant woman and accepts her baby as his own.  

Dr. Praetorius is a progressive gynecologist who is on the board of a prominent university. It’s unclear, but he probably lectures there occasionally and is very popular with most of the students and faculty. His main focus, however, is on the patients in his clinic. Hume Cronyn’s character Dr. Elwell, a professor at the university, is jealous of Dr. Praetorius’ popularity so much so that at the beginning of the movie, he’s begun an investigation into Dr. Praetorius past hoping to find dirt on him so he can be expelled from his position. 

In the first scene with Dr. Praetorious we discover that Mr. Shunderson is always at his side. No one knows who Shunderson is, or his relationship to Dr. Praetorius. He’s regarded with suspicion and even ridicule by the students faculty, and staff at the clinic. However, Dr. Praetorius dear friend Professor Barker, played by Walter Slezak, accepts Shunderson without question. 

Another thing that happens in that first scene is that while Dr. Praetorius is waiting for Dr. Elwell in his classroom, he meets Deborah when she faints as he is addressing the class. Deborah goes to see him later that day to find out why she fainted and is told that she’s pregnant. Their frank discussion following this disclosure, and her subsequent suicide attempt, disturb Dr. Praetorius who is dedicated to “making sick people well”. But deciding how he can help Deborah becomes a problem. When he goes to see if he can convince her father to accept Deborah and  her baby, he discovers that she and her father have been living with her uncle, a very closed minded man. It’s obvious they long to escape but because Mr. Higgins is in poor health and is unable to support himself and Deborah they’re trapped. 

Though Dr. Praetorius has truly fallen in love with Deborah, we do see as he goes about his rounds in his clinic, that he is a man of great compassion. He’s willing to try unconventional means to heal his patients. He spreads love and hope wherever he goes and that is the true secret to his popularity.

People Will Talk is a story about love in all its facets, romantic, friendship, family, and caring for the less fortunate. It’s the kind of story that makes me want to be a better person.

The last movie I’m going to share with you might seem a bit unusual. It’s The Big Country (1958) starring Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons, Carroll Baker and Charlton Heston. Although this is a Western, it’s not typical of the genre. It’s a story of Jim McKay, played by Gregory Peck, and the influence he has on the people and situations in his new home. 

Jim’s family owns a shipping line. He’s also the captain of his own ship. He is engaged to Patricia, whom he met in Boston while she was attending finishing school. Her father, Maj. Henry Terrill, owns the largest ranch in his part of Texas. 

When Jim arrives he is unaware that the Terrills are having a blood feud with the Hannassey family headed by Rufus, played by Burl Ives. Tensions flair up on Jim’s arrival. He’s hazed by some of the Hannassey bunch, but when he doesn’t take offense at it, Pat, the Major, and Steve Leach the Terrill foreman, played by Charlton Heston, just don’t understand him. They think he’s a coward. But that’s not it at all. Jim is a man of deep principles. He’s travelled all over the world, been in dangerous situations, seen cruelty, courage, and been confronted with death. All of these things have made him a man of peace. He’s faced his fears and shortcomings, knows his strengths and has accepted who he is. One thing for sure, he’s not a man to stand around and watch senseless violence.

Almost from the beginning Jim feels that he and Pat aren’t the match he thought they were. He comes to realize that Pat’s friend, Julie Maragon is the woman for him. Their love comes about in very subtle ways as Jim decides to try to stop the feud. Along the way he affects both the Terrill ranch hands and the Hannasseys so that they see that the feud is extremely destructive. This movie is the perfect example of how one person can change everything.

I could go on and on about movies and TV shows that shine a light on characters who confront their wounds and then spread goodness wherever they go. These are the kind of stories that enrich my life. 

Thanks for reading. I appreciate your likes and comments. Have a wonderful Valentine’s Day if you celebrate it where you live. Spreading love every day is my goal. I hope it’s yours too.

Lucinda Sage-Midgorden © 2021

Lucinda is the author of The Space Between Time, an award finalist in the “Fiction: Fantasy” category of the 2017 Best Book Awards.

Have you ever experienced life shattering events? Yeah, most of us have. In The Space Between Time, Jenna Holden gets slammed by her fiancé walking out, her mother’s untimely death, and losing her job all in one week. But she receives unexpected help when she finds her three-times great-grandmother’s journals and begins the adventure of a lifetime.

The Space Between Time is available in all ebook formats at Smashwords and for Kindle at Amazon, or you can find the ebook at iBooks or Barnes and Noble. If you prefer a physical copy, you can find a print-on-demand version at Amazon. Stay tuned for news when the audiobook version is published.

Lucinda is also the host of Story-Power a new podcast where she and her guests discuss the stories in all formats that have changed their lives. It’s available here on Sage Woman Chronicles and on Apple, Google, and Spotify podcast apps. Please rate and leave a review. It helps people find me.

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Human Connections

An image of the Kunta Kinte Alex Haley Memorial in Annapolis.

“Because you know what happens when you say ‘hello’ or ‘good morning?’ You make a connection. And isn’t that what being human is all about?” ~ Philip Rosenthal

So, Barry and I decided to watch this new show on SyFy channel, (Why they changed the spelling to that is beyond me) called Resident Alien. It’s a sci-fi comedy about an alien who was sent to plant a device that would kill off the human race. But his ship gets hit by lighting and the device is lost in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, his ship crashes, and he’s got to find the device to complete his mission. What to do? He finds a human living in a remote cabin. He kills him and takes his form. He thinks no one will interact with him but, of course, that’s where the story begins. There’s been a murder in the small town, and since the person who was murdered was the town doctor, the Sheriff comes to him to examine the body, because his human counterpart was a doctor.

Obviously, it’s a fish-out-of-water kind of story. But in the very first episode, the alien notices that humans long for, and create connections with each other and in his narration says, “That may be their greatest strength.” And I think he’s right.

I admit that I love being quiet at home, but yesterday when I was teaching my acting class, I did enjoy the connections with my students even though it was via Zoom. It’s fun to watch them try the acting techniques and do amazing things even if this is their first attempt at acting.

It is my philosophy that anyone can be a good actor. We are, after all doing it all the time. But one thing I’ve always loved about theatre and its iterations is that the actors connect the audience to the story which is always about the ins and outs of human connections, or sometimes disconnections.

If we look for them, we can find stories of humans making connections all the time even in real life. This morning I read a sweet story about Marine Capt. Evan Campbell who assisted Lady Gaga to her place at the mic to sing the National Anthem at the Presidental Inauguration. He said she looked at him and said something like, “we have an equal chance of tripping on this dress.” And when she seemed nervous about singing, he assured her she would do great. It was then that she asked him to pray with her. He was touched by her down-to-earth manner and I was touched by their brief but very real human connection.

During these difficult times, I seek out stories with strong human connections, where love is the main theme. That’s why I love doing my Story~Power podcast. I get to connect with people who love stories as much as I do and even though we’re only talking over Zoom, I feel a deep connection with them. Another perk is that I get to hear about stories I’ve never known about but might want to check out.

Connecting with others is a vital part of being alive for me. I have at times thought what it would be like to be stranded on a desert island like Tom Hanks character in Castaway, but even though I’m an introvert and love being alone, there would come a point where I might go crazy as he almost did from not having any human interaction at all.

In the spirit of human connectedness, I’d like to thank Buzzweed, Juan Jaya, drjurishama – The 3H: health, happiness, healing, and Dirty Scifi Buddha, for liking my podcast post with one of my acting students, David Featherston, “Basketball to Theatre”, episode 7. I tried to connect with all of you, but ran into some difficulty, so I’m thanking you here. Even a like for one of my blog or podcast posts creates a human connection. 

Have a fantastic weekend all. I hope your human connections are positive.

Blessings,

Lucinda Sage-Midgorden © 2021

Lucinda is the author of The Space Between Time, an award finalist in the “Fiction: Fantasy” category of the 2017 Best Book Awards.

Have you ever experienced life shattering events? Yeah, most of us have. In The Space Between Time, Jenna Holden gets slammed by her fiancé walking out, her mother’s untimely death, and losing her job all in one week. But she receives unexpected help when she finds her three-times great-grandmother’s journals and begins the adventure of a lifetime.

The Space Between Time is available in all ebook formats at Smashwords and for Kindle at Amazon, or you can find the ebook at iBooks or Barnes and Noble. If you prefer a physical copy, you can find a print-on-demand version at Amazon. Stay tuned for news when the audiobook version is published.

Lucinda is also the host of Story-Power a new podcast where she and her guests discuss the stories in all formats that have changed their lives. It’s available here on Sage Woman Chronicles and on Apple, Google, and Spotify podcast apps. Please rate and leave a review. It helps people find me.

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