Speaking Out

Tattered but Salvageable

“You must always be willing to truly consider evidence that contradicts your beliefs, and admit the possibility that you may be wrong. Intelligence isn’t knowing everything. It’s the ability to challenge everything you know.” ~ Meme shared on Facebook by Deb Sprague.

Propaganda: “information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to help or harm a person, group, movement, institution, nation, etc.” ~ Dictionary.com

“Only love is real.” ~ A Course in Miracles

I’m going to do something I should have done long ago and break my own rule to be careful with what I write, because the energies are coming to a head and I can’t keep quiet any longer. I know some of you following me are not from the U.S. The politicians I write about today might not mean anything to you, but I hope my internal process will make sense.

And, trigger alert, I’m not going to sugar coat my views as I usually do. You don’t have to read or even follow me if you’re offended. The time has come for me to be brutally honest.

I’m voting for Joe Biden for President of the United States. He wasn’t my first choice. And I’m not voting for him so I can “Vote Blue, No Matter Who,” either. Nor is my decision to vote for Biden a choice between the lesser of two evils. I’m voting for a man of integrity, decency, and deep caring for his fellow citizens. Biden wasn’t my first choice. I didn’t think he was a great person to lead our country until recently. Let me tell you my process.

As you might have guessed by many of my previous posts, I’m a proud liberal. I was taught to be open to new ideas and to examine my own thought processes. I was taught to have an open mind and heart and accept and love people as they were and not try to change them. That’s the definition of a liberal. Since some conservatives have used propaganda to demonize that word, we liberals have turned to the word “progressive” to describe ourselves. That’s my starting point.

After being a lifelong Democrat, I changed my party affiliation to Independent during the 2016 election because I felt that the DNC was pushing Hillary Clinton on us, even though Bernie Sanders had tremendous support from the young, people of color and even people like me, old Baby Boomers. Polls can be manipulated, but many of them showed that Bernie was the one to defeat Donald Trump. When Hillary was nominated, I was angry and saw conspiracy theories. Well, there were conspiracies to interfere in our elections, but perhaps not among the Democratic Party leadership.

Morph to earlier this year. I’m still registered as an Independent, but the only options among progressives were Democratic candidates. There were four I liked, candidates I thought could possibly get the nomination and defeat Trump. Bernie Sanders, Pete Buttigieg, Kamala Harris, and Elizabeth Warren were my favorites. But there were so many candidates running, I knew I had to wait to see which ones would be left standing by summer.

It finally came down to Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. I didn’t want Joe Biden! I thought he was a weak candidate. My mind filled with conspiracy theories again. Were the Russians interfering with the Democrats? But as I talked with my sister, Celeste, about the situation, we said to each other, “We have to consider what Divine Spirit wants.” And so we started to listen to Biden. We listened to the people who knew him and we changed our minds.

The Democratic and Republican conventions are over now. And it’s clear to me that, as Nicholle Wallace of MSNBC said on the August 26th evening broadcast of the Republican convention, “We can’t keep up with the propaganda. They are not telling lies. They are serving and producing propaganda. And we are still four years into this presidency ill equipped to respond to it.” That got me thinking, how do we combat propaganda? And what I believe is that we expose it for what it is. That’s what honest journalists, people who worked with Trump, and even his family members have been doing. They’re tearing off his mask so we can see his true motives, his true character.

I’ve talked so often over the last three years with people about the fact that we as a nation had to have Donald Trump become our president, because we’ve ignored all our opportunities to heal old wounds of racism, financial inequity, and so much more, going back since the beginning of our country. At the beginning of Donald Trump’s presidency, it felt like the darkness had descended and we’d never see the light again. The daily news bore out my feelings. But as Gary Zukav wrote in his book Seat of the Soul, humans learn through crisis. And I felt that not only our country, but the world was at a confluence of historical crises with great changes on the horizon.

I’m so glad I took a step back to examine why I didn’t like Biden, because I started to notice that he has been consulting many of the people who had been running against him. The Democrats are forming a coalition. They are taking a serious look at the problems we’re facing, and planning how to solve them. And they aren’t letting Trump have all the air time. They are challenging his assertions, pointing out his lies, and blocking his policies that are trying to erode our Democracy.

As I paid closer attention to Biden I heard him comfort people who had suffered the loss of loved ones from gun violence or the pandemic. He shared the pain of the loss of his own loved ones. He exhibited empathy and compassion with those suffering people. And that’s what we need right now, someone who is softer, sympathetic, compassionate, but tough enough to work for all of us.

Another thing I liked about him was that he owned the mistakes he made in the past, like when he didn’t believe Anita Hill when she related what happened between her and Clarence Thomas and then he voted to confirm Thomas as a Supreme Court Justice. He apologized to Anita Hill for that. Owning up to your mistakes takes courage.

The clincher for me was the deep contrast between the Democratic and Republican conventions. These are words I heard speakers use at the Democratic convention: Compassion, empathy, decency, honor, hope for the future, equity, healing racial wounds, ending divisions by listening to each other, sharing love, and light to every person in this country.

At the Republican convention, the RNC decided not to have any platform other than to bow to Trump’s wishes, which are all about spreading fear, hate, division, and using words like “law and order” to mean making the populace do what he wants them to do. He punishes people, businesses, and states that challenge his xenophobic racism and his orders to harm the environment. When asked about how he feels about the huge number of deaths from the virus, he said, “It is what it is.” He’s shut down journalists who ask him the tough questions that he doesn’t want to answer because they make him look bad. I could write a book about all the things he’s done that are unethical, uncaring, or even violations of the law, but you probably already know what they are.

So many prominent Republicans, honorable conservatives, have walked away from their party because their leaders kowtowed to Trump. That tells me that we are waking up. Old paradigms that no longer serve our country or humanity are breaking down. The words, “It’s nothing personal, it’s just business,” aren’t acceptable any more. Profit, the bottom line, and hoarding wealth and disrespecting human dignity are on their way out.

I learned two words this week that describe Trump perfectly. The first was spoken by Michael Steele, former head of the RNC, and a former Republican. He used the word “sycophantic”, to describe Trump. It means “a self-seeking, servile flatterer’ fawning parasite’ (Dictionary.com). As you might have guessed, I had to look that one up.

The second word popped up on Dictionary.com when I was looking up another word I wanted to use in this post. It’s the word of the day for August 27, “vituperate: to use or address with harsh or abusive language; revile …” That word also describes Trump.

You know the times they are changin’ when the players and teams of the NBA, and many other sports teams refuse to play games until the violence against blacks and other people of color stops. I know Trump won’t stop it. He ripped the scab off of racism, he has fueled and condoned it because it serves his purposes to do so. But, thank heaven he has, because now we whites are being forced to take a good look at ourselves and all we or our ancestors have done to suppress, cheat, enslave, and kill people of color.

I’ve asked myself, what attitudes do I have that are racist? What do I assume I know, but am completely ignorant about? It’s an uncomfortable task to undertake. But it’s necessary and I’m doing it because I believe that each individual person is important and should be treated with dignity and respect.

No political party or politician is perfect. To think that we’re going to be able to elect the perfect leader, is wrong. No one person can shoulder all of the burden. But it’s our responsibility to do our research and choose the best people running for offices that we can. And we have to find ways large and small to make this world a better place in which to live.

I may not vote for the same people you will. But if we stop following the crowd and let go of our prejudices and actually listen with open minds and hearts to the candidates, that’s the best thing we can do. What words does the candidate use? Are they loving and compassionate? Do they have clear plans for how to begin the work of solving problems? Or do they point the finger and blame other people? Do they ignore their mistakes? How do you feel when you listen to them? Examine those feelings. Do you like or dislike them because their message is dark and hateful, or is it because you have a set idea in your head about what you want to hear and you’re not willing to be open to this particular candidate?

If you’re on the fence about what kind of person should be in the White House come January 2021, I suggest you watch The American President (1995). In a speech to the press near the end of the movie, Andrew Shepard, played by Michael Douglas, says, “America isn’t easy. America is advanced citizenship. You gotta want it bad, ‘cause it’s gonna put up a fight.” I wish I could quote the entire speech, but I want you to watch the movie because it’s main theme is about character. In that same speech, Shepard says, “Being president of this country is *entirely* about character.” I’d say being any kind of leader is about character. So the question is, which candidate, Joe Biden, or Donald Trump has an upstanding character? Which of the people of either party up and down the ballot are people of honor? I’m going to do my research, and those are the people I’m going to vote for.

My aim is to spread love and light with this blog, which means pointing out darkness and hatred that we need to deal with as well. We can’t build a better world if we hide from the nastiness of life. So, if you’re going to leave comments, make sure they are respectful and thoughtful. I’m not going to allow any attacking of myself, or other commenters on this site. Nasty comments will be removed or not approved, because remember, only love is real. All the other stuff is just our egos getting in the way.

Thanks for following, reading and liking. I hope we can build a better world together.

Lucinda Sage-Midgorden © 2020

Lucinda is the author of The Space Between Time, an award finalist in the “Fiction: Fantasy” category of the 2017 Best Book Awards.

Have you ever experienced life shattering events? Yeah, most of us have. In The Space Between Time, Jenna Holden gets slammed by her fiancé walking out, her mother’s untimely death, and losing her job all in one week. But she receives unexpected help when she finds her three-times great-grandmother’s journals and begins the adventure of a lifetime.

The Space Between Time is available in all ebook formats at Smashwords and for Kindle at Amazon, or you can find the ebook at iBooks or Barnes and Noble. If you prefer a physical copy, you can find a print-on-demand version at Amazon. Stay tuned for news when the audiobook version is published.

My Kind of Story

Inside Powell’s bookstore

“Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic; they are ideally set up to understand stories.” ~ Roger C. Schank, Cognitive Scientist

“Self-acknowledgment boosts your emotional and spiritual immunity, giving you the strength you need to release the past and rise above fear, doubt or resignation.” ~ Debbie Ford

As I’ve written here many times, I’m passionate about stories in different genres, styles, and formats. I love classic stories as well as the modern ones.

As I’ve listened to my favorite podcast, “What Should I Read Next,” I’ve been prompted to think about what stories hit that sweet spot for my reading, or watching satisfaction.

This is what I came up with. I love stories where the main character is plopped into an unfamiliar situation and must learn to navigate it. Along the way, he or she learns a lot about themselves. I also love stories about found families, unusual love relationships, quirky stories about an unexpected inner life of a character that manifests in interesting ways. But at the heart of every story I love, are characters who heal their wounds and their fears and transform them into love. When I say love, I don’t mean just romantic love. In the stories that feed my soul, the characters open their hearts and embrace the world around them, flaws and all.

While I love action books and pictures, I don’t want a steady diet of them. Once I got hooked on classic British literature in high school, it was the slow to develop, the quiet stories I have enjoyed the most.

I’m reading one right now that hits all those boxes. It’s The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan. I started it on Monday and by the time this entry posts, I will have finished it. Part of why I love it so much is because it’s a gentle story of people just living their lives, trying to figure things out. Sometimes when life is big and dramatic, as it is now, I need the quiet stories to sooth my nerves.

In The Keeper of Lost Things, several character’s lives intertwine around a writer, Anthony, who lost the love of his life and the gift she gave him, on what would have been their wedding day. Her death set him on an unusual path. In an effort to find the small medallion of St. Therese, Anthony’s love Therese had given him, he picks up lost things, takes them home, catalogues them and then tries to return them to their owners. He writes fanciful stories about the items which are hugely popular. But as he gets older he realizes that some of the owners of the lost items don’t want them back because they represent too much pain. So he begins to write darker stories about them. His publisher rejects these stories which causes Anthony to stop writing all together.

Along the way, he hires an assistant, Laura, who is recovering from wounds of her own, and when Anthony dies, she discovers he has left her everything he owns with the directive to continue to return as many of the lost items as she can. And doing that leads her to discover all the details of Anthony and Therese’s story while helping her transform from an emotionally closed person, to someone open hearted. She finds her purpose because of Anthony.

I think it’s a blessing to have so many creative people offering their talents with different types of music, stories, and visual art to help us get in touch with our emotions. The other day I was thinking, and it occurred to me that my emotions, which have been bubbling to the surface lately, are my true link to the Divine. Our minds are great tools, but we get all tangled up when we try to understand the majesty and vastness of everything outside our mental constructs. It’s our emotions that help us understand, even if it’s only by small amounts how connected we are to each other and everything that exists. That’s why the arts are a necessity for our health. They help connect us to our emotions. They help us expand.

I’d love to hear what kinds of stories speak to you.

On another note, I’m getting ready to finish the audiobook for The Space Between Time. Because I’m teaching it may take me until the end of the year to finish it, but I’ll keep you posted about my progress.

Take care of yourselves. Thanks for reading, liking, and commenting. Blessings to you all.

Lucinda Sage-Midgorden © 2020

Lucinda is the author of The Space Between Time, an award finalist in the “Fiction: Fantasy” category of the 2017 Best Book Awards.

Have you ever experienced life shattering events? Yeah, most of us have. In The Space Between Time, Jenna Holden gets slammed by her fiancé walking out, her mother’s untimely death, and losing her job all in one week. But she receives unexpected help when she finds her three-times great-grandmother’s journals and begins the adventure of a lifetime.

The Space Between Time is available in all ebook formats at Smashwords and for Kindle at Amazon, or you can find the ebook at iBooks or Barnes and Noble. If you prefer a physical copy, you can find a print-on-demand version at Amazon. Stay tuned for news when the audiobook version is published.

From To Kill A Mockingbird, Jane Austen, the MCU, and Back Again, pt. 2

This is part two of my long conversation with my sister, Celeste Sage-Tate.



Story~Power is now available on Apple, Google, and Spotify podcast apps.



I have had the love of reading since 7th grade. I would spend hours after school just reading and seeing myself in the stories I read. I read many different genres. I do not limit myself. As a Life Coach I have read many books from Wayne Dyer, Deepak Chopra, and Marianne Williamson.

Part Two
The Crucible – Arthur Miller, Movie, (1996) Nicholas Hytner, director
To Kill A Mockingbird – Harper Lee, Movie, (1962) Robert Mulligan, director
Rise of the Guardians – (2012) Peter Ramsey, director
A Course In Miracles – New Christian Church of Full Endeavor
MCU movies, Kevin Feige, producer
Star Wars movies, George Lucas, creator
Star Trek series and movies, Gene Roddenberry, creator
The works of William Shakespeare
The works of Jane Austen
Avengers: Endgame (2019) Anthony and Joe Russo, directors
Iron Man – (2008) Jon Favreau, director
Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014) Anthony and Joe Russo, directors
Black Panther (2018) Ryan Coogler, director
Dr. Strange (2016) Scott Derrickson, director
Thor (2011) Kenneth Branagh, director
Black Widow – Character in the MCU, movie projected release (2020) Cate Shortland, director
The Road Less Traveled – M. Scott Peck
Die Hard (1988) John McTiernan, director
The Shining – Stephen King, Movie (1980) Stanley Kubrick, director
Cujo – Stephen King, Movie (1983) Lewis Teague, director
Movies by M. Night Shyamalan
The Sixth Sense (1999)
Signs (2002)
Lady in the Water (2006)
The Village (2004)
Seat of the Soul – Gary Zukav
Back to the Future (1985), Robert Zemeckis, director
Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen, Our favorite version – Mini-series (1995) Simon Langton, director
Now Voyager (1942), Irving Rapper, director

“Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic; they are ideally set up to understand stories.” ~ Roger C. Schank, Cognitie Scientist

Late Summer Blossoms

Free picture (Abdeckung. Herbst Blumen.)fall-flowers-very-vivid-colours-fragment-58174

“The Law of Divine Compensation posits that this is a self-organizing and self-correcting universe: the embryo becomes the baby, the bud becomes a blossom, the acorn becomes an oak tree. Clearly, there is some invisible force that is moving every aspect of reality to its next best expression.” ~ Marianne Williamson

“Any human anywhere will blossom in a hundred unexpected talents and capacities simply by being given the opportunity to do so.” ~ Doris Lessing

Today is the day before our fortieth anniversary. It hardly seems possible. I love where we are in our relationship. We’re busy working on fun projects, as much or more so than when we were young.

Since we are taking the entire weekend to celebrate, I won’t keep you long.

There are advantages to getting older. Oh, sure, we ache a little more but I’m feeling much more confident about being creative. I don’t worry what other people think and it feels like my intuition is working at a much higher level. That’s why I started my Story~Power podcast.

I’ve been listening to Anne Bogel’s podcast, “What Should I Read Next”, for a year or so and I love it. But as my first guest, Dave Dahl said, Shakespeare didn’t write in a niche, he wrote for the wealthy as well as the men working in the mines. “He wrote for everyone.” And the more I listened to Anne’s podcast, which is a niche program, I wanted to produce my own podcast where I could discuss a wider range of topics. I’m interested in books, movies, TV shows, and plays in all different styles and genres and I wanted to share all those with my listeners. One or more of my guests and I even talk about music and visual arts and the stories they tell.

There is just something about encountering the stories of people who are like me, and very different than me, that opens up my emotions and helps me feel more deeply connected to the rest of humanity. That’s what I want to share with my listeners.

I never thought I’d say this, but I love every aspect of producing this podcast. I love learning how to use the technology. I love the conversations, the editing, and prepping for publication. I even love sharing about it on social media, which I’ve been avoiding lately because it can be so contentious. I’m energized in a way I never thought I would be at sixty-seven years old. It’s as if I’ve finally come into my purpose.

For me, being “forced” to stay home has been like reaping the seeds of ideas that have been floating around in my mind for a long time. I’m basking in the energy of what is flowering.

If you’re so inclined to listen and help me spread the word, go to Apple, Google, and Spotify podcast apps and rate or write a review for Story~Power. Episode three, which airs on August 19, is the second part of my conversation with my sister Celeste. She and I talk about classic books and movies as well as more modern ones like the MCU series and what we’ve learned from each of them. In fact I found each conversation with my guests immensely satisfying. I have learned a lot from them.

Well, I’m off to celebrate. Have a lovely weekend. Stay safe and healthy. Blessings to you all.

Lucinda Sage-Midgorden © 2020

Lucinda is the author of The Space Between Time, an award finalist in the “Fiction: Fantasy” category of the 2017 Best Book Awards.

Have you ever experienced life shattering events? Yeah, most of us have. In The Space Between Time, Jenna Holden gets slammed by her fiancé walking out, her mother’s untimely death, and losing her job all in one week. But she receives unexpected help when she finds her three-times great-grandmother’s journals and begins the adventure of a lifetime.

The Space Between Time is available in all ebook formats at Smashwords and for Kindle at Amazon, or you can find the ebook at iBooks or Barnes and Noble. If you prefer a physical copy, you can find a print-on-demand version at Amazon. Stay tuned for news when the audiobook version is published.

A Short Post

The Community of Christ Seal of my childhood

“It’s those difficult times that inform the next wonderful time, and it’s a series of trade-offs, of events, of wins and losses.” ~ Brad Pitt

“Difficult times disrupt your conventional ways of thinking and push you to forge better habits of thought, performance and being.” ~ Robin S. Sharma


 I could use some peace right about now. How about you?

We’ve had some issues revamping my site, as you can see. My husband is helping me but he’s got to do some research before we can fix all the glitches. And, of course, life gets in the way. I hope we’ll have all the issues worked out by the end of August. We’ll see.

I’ve enjoyed my Story~Power chats and am looking forward to the next round which will be posted in the new year. I hope you are getting the notifications and enjoying the two which have aired so far. I’ve had many amazing conversations with my guests.

At the moment, I’m getting ready for a new semester of teaching at the college. It was touch and go as to whether I’d be teaching at all, but it looks like my very small classes will be offered. I’ll be teaching both classes using Zoom. Dave and I did teach acting that way at the end of last semester, but to do it for an entire semester is going to be really interesting. The other class dramatic structure won’t be affected that much.

But back to my opening statement, I don’t know about you, but I’ve been very emotional lately with everything that’s going on and then there was the explosion in Lebanon. That sent me into a tizzy. I’ve cranked up my spiritual practice of meditation, sending Reiki, journaling and the like just to maintain some balance. It takes me longer every day to finish this important work. At first I was feeling quite anxious about it, but then I remembered that if I’m going to make it through this time of upheaval, I must go within. That’s just as, if not more important, than any of my other creative work.

I hope you are all are keeping safe and sane. In my daily meditations, I send out love and light to all of you, and everyone on the planet. We must support each other in order to make it through these extremely difficult times. Here’s hoping we catch a break soon.

I hope to have a longer post next week.

Love and blessings to you all.

Lucinda Sage-Midgorden © 2020

Lucinda is the author of The Space Between Time, an award finalist in the “Fiction: Fantasy” category of the 2017 Best Book Awards.

Have you ever experienced life shattering events? Yeah, most of us have. In The Space Between Time, Jenna Holden gets slammed by her fiancé walking out, her mother’s untimely death, and losing her job all in one week. But she receives unexpected help when she finds her three-times great-grandmother’s journals and begins the adventure of a lifetime.

The Space Between Time is available in all ebook formats at Smashwords and for Kindle at Amazon, or you can find the ebook at iBooks or Barnes and Noble. If you prefer a physical copy, you can find a print-on-demand version at Amazon. Stay tuned for news when the audiobook version is published.